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Nana Mother Nature

  • 6 of 12
Nana Mother Nature
    cataleptik
    by cataleptik

    After 99 years, my great-grandmother succumbed.   But she had a treasure for me.  a cardboard box filled with photographs going back to the late 1920s.  Photos that had not seen the light of day in decades.  Images of all the generations that I had heard of, but never seen.   My fat old Nana with her big old bosoms.  I had never really imagined her as a lovely young woman.  How beautiful she is! I am truly blessed, and every now and then something is revealed and I realise that I am even more blessed than I knew! 

    There's Mrs. Margaret Elizabeth Scott Parker, whose material existence spanned from 1910 to 2009.

    A Bible reader, and a Tropical Capricorn, she existed for 99 years and seven days, and on the seventh day, with my mother, her grand-daughter, close by, she rested, having outlived her husband, my great-grandfather, and her daughter, my grandmother, the beautician, Nana Marguerite.

     

    Nana is a given name that has different origins in several countries across the world. Its use as a feminine or masculine name varies culturally. It is feminine in Japan, Korea, Georgia and Greece, and it is masculine in Ethiopia and India, and epicene in Ghana and Indonesia. In Georgia, Nana is the fifth most popular given name for girls. In Ghana, among the Akan people, particularly the AkyemAshanti and Akuapim peoples, Nana is used as the title of a monarch to signify their status. Furthermore, the stool name of kings and queens is always preceded by Nana. Non-royal Ghanaian people also use Nana as a given name. In some cases, they may adopt the name Nana, if they have been named after a monarch. In Ghana, one can respectfully refer to a King or Queen as Nana without mentioning their full name.