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shouting thread

    • ura soul

      by ura soul

      every minute i spend growing food is a minute i am spending coming into balance with my environment and that in itself maximises the time i do invest in research. 10 minutes of balanced research can be more valuable than 10 years of unbalanced research.

      • SoulFish

        Totally agree. I love reading, spent some time as a research librarian, it was awesome. For me though, while I dig the knowledge I can get from research I always find I feel compelled to take another step and experiment. I have to apply the knowledge and through experience let it become wisdom. That's how I know it's working.

        • innerverse

          I enjoy my garden beyond my ability to describe.

          • SoulFish

            I miss having a garden, where I live right now I can barely keep houseplants, it's small and a quadraplex I'm in the middle of, so no windows on two sides of the house. There is however, a nice lady down the street who has a fantastic garden so I chatted with her a couple years ago. Now I save her knees by working her garden for her and I get paid in food, it's awesome.

            • ura soul

              that's a great way to solve the problem. communal gardens are the way forward in a bigger picture sense :)

              • innerverse

                I need a set up like that, I am such a gardening novice that some of my effort goes to waste. But it's still infinitely rewarding just to spend time in the dirt with Mama Earth.

                • SoulFish

                  I have lived in community before, on several occasions, I'm a wayfarer from way back. I remember one area I lived in looked for all the world like a regular neighborhood save for the outbuilding at the end of the street where there were things like lawnmowers and yard supplies and all sorts of things that everyone on the block had access to. In the spring they made schedules for the mower and such, it was very organized. They shared kids too, meaning that little Suzy from next door could babysit your kid while little Billy from down the block could go grab the community mower and cut your grass and all you'd have to do is buy them beer....WAIT, just kidding. But you COULD pay them, or help them with their homework or fix their car...whatever. It was all barter and trade all the time, or as some folks call it, "in kind." It's a lovely way to live. I miss that too. Seems I might need to beat my feet down the street again, I'm happiest on the road and in the forest.