• light
  • dark

YOU ARE CONFUSED

    cataleptik
    by
    This extensive list of titles of the Goddess Aphrodíti (Aphrodite; Gr. Ἀφροδίτη) includes all of the epithets found in Orphic Hymn 55 and many, many more gathered from numerous sources.
     
    Photo
     
     

    6 comments

    6
     
     

    one plus one

     
     
     

    no shares

     
    Shared privately
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      Origin of All - (Orphic hymn 55.5).

      Ouranía - (Urania; Gr. Οὐρανία, ΟΥΡΑΝΙΑ) In Orphic hymn 55.1, Aphrodíti is called Ouranía, of the Sky, of Ouranós (Uranus; Gr. Οὐρανός).

      She is depicted in the mythology as emerging from the foam which resulted when the genitals of Ouranós fell into the sea and it refers to her mystic ability to harmonize the soul.

      This in contradistinction to pándimos (the common or popular) Aphrodíti. Cf. Pándimos.

       
       
      REPLY
       
      10m
       
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      Philopánnykhos - (Gr. φιλοπάννυχος, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΝΝΥΧΟΣ. Adj. Etym. φιλο "friend" + πάννυχος "all night long.") friend of all-night festivity. (Orphic hymn 55.2)

      Rather than referring to religious festivals, this epithet refers to her friendliness toward the seductive liaisons which occur late into the evening hours.
       
       
      REPLY
       
      9m
       
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      Ællinismόs (Hellenismos; Gr. Ἑλληνισμός), the ancient Greek religion, is the worship of many Gods. How charming and fantastic are the stories which whisper impressions of their character! Mighty Zeus reigns forever alongside beautiful Hera, and hosts and hosts of deities flank them in a magnificent hierarchy. It all seems so glorious, such that we would like to believe it all, yet it would seem that a rational person must relegate these stories to the realm of fantasy. Are the Gods real? These are ancient stories from a religion whose season, we are assured, has expired. Yet the stories persist in our literature and culture; they are compelling and it is not so easy to completely dismiss them. But how are we to interpret this literature and how should we understand the Gods it speaks of?

      The deepest and most profound understanding of Ællinismόs is found in what are called the Mystíria (Mysteries; Gr. Μυστήρια). The Mysteries speak of personal Gods. This means that the stories of our religion reflect something eminently real, but what exactly does this mean?

      The tradition holds that there are various classes of deity. Some of these deities are impersonal, i.e. without consciousness. For instance, the ideas of great majesty are divine, but devoid of sensibility. Some examples of these are Providence (Τύχη), Law (Νόμος), the Four Boniform (Cardinal) Virtues, being Courage (Ἀνδρεία), Temperance (Σωφροσύνη), Justice (Δικαιοσύνη) and Wisdom (Σοφία), and many others. Furthermore, there are other types of impersonal deities, but to innumerate them here is not necessary.

      The personal deities, on the other hand, are sentient beings with consciousness. As outrageous as it may seem, the tradition tells us that they have sensibility. They are living beings who have awareness, and they can act and respond. Examples of such personal deities would be the Olympian Gods Apóllohn (Ἀπόλλων), Ártæmis (Ἄρτεμις), Athiná (Ἀθηνᾶ), and Poseidóhn (Ποσειδῶν), etc. And there are hosts of other deities who share this characteristic. The personal deities can "hear your prayers," as explained by the teachers of our religion.
       
       
      REPLY
       
      5m
       
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      30. Jesus said, "Where there are three deities, they are divine. Where there are two or one, I am with that one."

      Apocrypha of Tammuz
      The Gospel of Thomas Collection - Translations and Resources
      The Gospel of Thomas Collection - Translations and Resources
      gnosis.org
       
       
      REPLY
       
      3m
       
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      Krýphios - (cryphius; Gr. κρύφιος, ΚΡΥΦΙΟΣ. fem./masc. nom. Adj.) hidden, concealed, occult, secretive. (Orphic Hymn 55.9)
       
       
      REPLY
       
      3m
       
    • Mikal De Valia's profile photo
      Kýpris - (Cypris; Gr. Κύπρις, ΚΥΠΡΙΣ) Aphrodíti is called Kýpris for, as told in the mythology, she was born from the foam which formed when the genitals of Ouranós (Uranus; Gr. Οὐρανός) fell into the sea off the shore of the island of Kýpros (Cyprus; Gr. Κύπρος).